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Archive for the ‘Tea Party’ Category

Nostalgia For All Those Born Before 1945

WE ARE SURVIVORS!!! CONSIDER THE CHANGES WE HAVE WITNESSED

 

We were born before televison, before penicillin, before polio shots, ballpoint pens; before pantyhose, dishwashers, clothes dryers, electric blankets, air conditioners, drip dry clothes — and way before man walked on the moon.

 

We even got married first and then lived together. How quaint can you be? In our time closets were only for clothes, not for “coming out of”. Designer Jeans were scheming girls named Jean or Jeanne, and having a meaningful relationship meant getting along with our cousins.

 

We thought fast food was what you ate during Lent, and outer space were the upper rows in the balcony of our favorite movie theatre. We were born before anybody had coined the term house-husbands. There were no such things as gay rights or computer dating, dual careers or commuter marriages and this was before day-care centers, group therapy and nursing homes.

 

We never heard of FM radio, tape decks, electric typewriters, artificial hearts, word processors, let alone computers, yogurt and guys wearing earrings. For us, time-sharing meant togetherness not computers or condominiums; a chip referred to a piece of wood, hardware meant screw drivers or hammers, and software wasn’t even a word.

 

In 1940, “Made in Japan” meant  junk and the term “making out” referred to how you did on your exam. “Macdonalds” and Instant coffee were unheard of. We hit the scene when there were 5 & 10 cent stores, where you actually bought things for 5 and 10 cents.  Ice cream cones cost a nickel or at the most a dime.  If you lived in a big city you could ride a streetcar from one side of town  to the other for a nickel. What else could a nickel buy? Well you could make a telephone call, buy a “Pepsi” or enough stamps to mail one letter and two postcards.

 

A brand new Chevy coupe was available for $600…but  who could afford one? A pity, too because gas was only 11 cents a gallon! In our day cigarette smoking was fashionable. Grass was mowed, never smoked. Coke was a cold drink and pot was something you cooked in. Rock music helped grandma’s put their babies to sleep and “Aids” were helpers in the principal’s office.

 

We certainly knew there were differences between the sexes but changing sexes would have been unthinkable. We made do with what we had. And we were so dumb as to think we needed a husband to have a baby. No wonder we are so confused and there is such a generation gap today.

 

But we survived!!!  What better reason to celebrate?

 

Another reason to celebrate is finding a new job for those who have been downsized by  their companies having to close stores or outsourcing jobs to low wage countries. If you or somebody you know is in this fix, I have good news for you. Here’s an inexpensive way to learn how to start your own money making business right from your own home A business you can be never be fired from.  A business that can provide a way for you to make part-time income when you retire or full time income without the expense of an outside office or the rent for a storefront. That business is MAIL ORDER and it’s booming like never before… all due  to  the world wide web. Selling a product or service right from your home to someone living hundreds or thousands of miles from you, even, overseas is a way for you  to say goodbye  to uncaring bosses forever.

 

HOW TO BECOME A MAIL ORDER MILLIONAIRE is a complete guide to starting your own home based business. Written by long time mail order expert Fred Broitman, founder of Chicago’s largest independently owned direct response advertising agency, SUNMAN DIRECT. If you would like to start a business that you can operate from your home no matter where you live and sell a product or service to men and women all over the world, then take advantage of this special offer and save 25%. It’s available to order from Amazon for $39.95 plus s&h. However if you order direct from the publisher, it’s yours for only $29.95 and shipping is FREE.

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Who Really Invented the Internet?

Now There’s A Headline That Really Caught My Attention!

It’s from the July 23, 2012 issue of The Wall Street Journal written by L. Gordon Crovitz.

“The Internet didn’t get invented on its own. Government research created the Internet so that all companies could make money off the Internet.” – President Barack Obama

Mr. Crovitz quotes President Barack Obama saying, “The Internet didn’t get invented on its own. Government research created the Internet so that all companies could make money off the Internet”  It’s an urban legend that the government launched the Internet.  The myth is that the Pentagon created the Internet to keep its communications lines up even in a nuclear strike. The truth is a more interesting story about how innovation happens— and about how hard it is to build successful technology companies even once the government gets out of the way.

“The creation of the Arpanet was not motivated by considerations of war.” – Robert Taylor, Computer Scientist

For many technologists, the idea of the Internet traces to Vannevar Bush, the presidential science adviser during World War II who oversaw the development of radar and the Manhattan Project. In a 1946 article in The Atlantic titled “As We May Think“, Bush defined an ambitious peacetime goal for technologists: Build what he called a “memex” through which “wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

That fired imaginations and by the 1960s technologists were trying to connect separate physical communications networks into one global network—“a world wide web.” The federal government was involved, modestly, via the Pentagon’s Advanced Research Projects Agency Network. Its goal was not maintaining communications during a nuclear attack, and it didn’t build the Internet. Robert Taylor, who ran the ARPA program in the 1960s, sent an email to fellow technologists in 2004 setting the record straight: “The creation of the Arpanet was not motivated by considerations of war. The Arpanet was not an Internet. An Internet is a connection between two or more computer networks.”

If the government didn’t invent the Internet, who did?

Vinton Cerf developed TCP/IP, the Internet’s backbone, and Tim Berners-Lee gets credit for hyperlinks.

But full credit goes to  the company where Mr. Taylor worked after leaving ARPA: Xerox. It was at the Xerox PARC labs in Silicon Valley in the 1970s that the Ethernet was developed to link different computer networks. Researchers there also developed the first personal computer (the Xerox Alto) and the graphical user interface that still drives computer usage today.

According to a book about Xerox PARC, “Dealers of Lightning” by Michael Hiltzik), its top researchers realized they couldn’t wait for the government to connect different networks, so they would have to do it themselves. “We have a more immediate problem than they do,” Robert Metcalfe told his colleague John Shoch in 1973. “We have more networks than they do.” Mr Shoch later recalled that ARPA staffers “were working under government funding and university contracts. …and all that slow, lugubrious behavior to contend with.”

So having created the Internet, why didn’t Xerox become the biggest company in the world? The answer explains the disconnect between a government-led view of business and how innovation actually happens.

Executives at Xerox headquaters in Rochester, N.Y. were focused on selling copiers. From their standpoint, the Ethernet was important only so that people in an office could link computers to share a copier.

In 1979 Steve Jobs visits Xerox Parc – “They just had no idea what they had”

Then in 1979 Steve Jobs negotiated an agreement whereby Xerox’s venture-capital division invested $1 million in Apple, with the requirement that Jobs get a full briefing on all the Xerox Parc innovations. “They just had no idea what they had,” Jobs later said, after launching hugely profitable Apple computers using concepts developed by Xerox.

Xerox’s copier business was lucrative for decades, but the company eventually had years of losses during the digital revolution. Xerox managers can console themselves that it’s rare for a company to make the transition from one technology to another.

“The Internet, in fact, reaffirms the basic free market critique of large government.” – Tyler Cowen, Economist

As for the government’s role, the Internet was fully privatized in 1995, when a remaining piece of the network run by the National Science Foundation was closed—just as the commercial Web began to boom. Economist Tyler Cowen wrote in 2005: “The Internet, in fact, reaffirms the basic free market critique of large government. Here for 30 years the government had an immensely useful protocol for transferring information, TCP/IP, but it languished…In less than a decade, private concerns have taken that protocol and created one of the most important technological revolutions of the millennia.”

It’s important to understand the history of the Internet because it’s too often wrongly cited to justify big government. It’s also important to recognize that building great technology businesses requires both innovation and the skills to bring innovations to market. As the contrast between Xerox and Apple shows, few business leaders succeed in this challenge.  Government had a role, but it is those who make it happen that deserve the credit.

The knowledge of how to use the Internet is a most important ingredient for business success. As a reader of my blog, I’d like to offer you a FREE copy of Denny Hatch’s 22 Rules for Internet Success. It’s yours for the asking; just send an email to: Send me a FREE copy of Denny Hatch’s 22 Rules for Internet Success

Growing Greed, Income Gap Threaten America

A hardening caste system driven by the insatiable greed of its wealthiest citizens.

America is devolving into a desperate almost Third World society defined by a hardening caste system driven by the insatiable greed of its wealthiest citizens. Nobel-Prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz argues in his new book The Price Of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future.

This is excerpted from a book review published in the Chicago Tribune July 12, 2012 by Bernard Vaughan. “We are now approaching the level of inequality that marks dysfunctional societies,”  Stiglitz writes. “It is a club that we would distinctly not want to join, including Iran, Jamaica, Uganda and the Philippines.”

Statistics on widening U.S. income inequality are well known, but Stiglitz details them to show the trend has passed into a danger zone.

About 30 years ago, the top 1 percent of income earners received 12 percent of the nation’s income, which could have been unacceptable enough, Stiglitz writes. But by 2007, the average after-tax income of the top 1 percent had reached $1,300,000 while the bottom 20 percent averaged only $17,800.

With the end of the Great Recession, the gap has only widened: The ratio of CEO annual compensation to that of the typical worker in 2010 was 243 to 1, the level it had been before the financial crisis, the author says.

These economic realities imperil America’s future, corrupting basic notions of fairness and justice critical in a thriving democracy.

Such dramatic inequality, according to Stiglitz is the byproduct of a bubble-strewn economy beholden to a deregulated and all-powerful financial industry all too often dictating government policies through its lobbying and money politics.  The author argues that these economic realities imperil America’s future, corrupting basic notions of fairness and justice critical in a thriving democracy. As inequality increases,opportunity decreases and cynicism is ascendant, Stiglitz says.

Alienation has begun to replace motivation,” Stiglitz writes. “Instead of social cohesion we have a new divisiveness.” Stiglitz’s book echoes others released recently by liberal-leaning voices examining America’s struggle to rebound from the financial calamity of 2008, including studies by economists Paul Krugman and Jeffrey Sachs, former President Bill Clinton and filmmaker Charles Ferguson.

Stiglitz, a former Clinton administration and World Bank economist, received the Nobel Prize for economics in 2001 and published a series of popular studies in the last decade starting with Globalization and its Discontents (2002), an attack on the International Monetary Fund’s austerity policies.

While Stiglitz’s book zeros in on the idea of inequality, it follows a similar script. Most of its pages are devoted to how America got where it is as opposed to what it can do to reverse course. Ample blame is assigned to the Reagan administration for ushering in an anti-government zeitgeist that Stiglitz argues has engorged the financial industry at the expense of the middle class. Clinton exacerbated financial deregulation, and President Barack Obama has missed a critical opportunity to rein in Wall Street, the book maintains.

Though Stiglitz teases the reader with solutions, it’s not until late in the book that he outlines his economic reform agenda. With some exceptions, many of his suggestions are similar to those offered by Sachs, Krugman and liberal activists. They face the same steep odds in the current political environment, with Obama and Democrats facing a staunchly conservative Republican Party in Congress, in most states—and even on the Supreme Court, some critics say, after decisions such as Bush versus Gore and Citizens United.

Stiglitz’s ideas often echo the Democrats agenda: tax reform so the wealthy pay more; reining in Wall Street; investing in education, technology and infrastructure; and campaign finance reform. He also argues for tempering globalization, where capital is allowed to migrate to the cheapest labor force and free flow of goods is unimpeded by anything but dollar considerations.

It could be the 1 percent who try to do something about inequality as they realize that their fates are bound to how the other 99 prcent live.

Ultimately, and ironically, Stiglitz says, it could be the 1 percenters who try to do something about inequality as they realize that their fates are bound to how the other 99 prcent live.

Throughout  history, this has been something  that the top 1 percent eventually do learn,” he writes. “Often, however, they learn it too late.”

While you’re waiting around for the 1 percenters to come to their senses, here’s a Free offer that may help you survive and thrive in these difficult economic times. If you have an interest in starting a business of their own, Denny Hatch, a friend and mail order guru has developed 22 Rules for Internet Success and with his permission I would like to send you a copy. It’s yours for the asking: Just shoot me an e-mail: Send me a FREE copy of Denny Hatch’s 22 Rules for Internet Success

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