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Learn to Listen to the Birds!

Bird Songs Can Teach Us A Thing or Two!

Why wasn’t this intruder getting the message? The Lord of the manor had warned him repeatedly to back off, with threatening gestures and loud admonitions. But the trespasser just sat there and kept singing. So in a flurry of feathers, the resident sparrow dived for his challenger’s head. Michael Beecher, a University of Washington biologist, finally stepped in to end the brawl, retrieving the stuffed sparrow and mini-speaker that tricked the real bird into believing his territory had been overrun.

 

Foe vanquished, the sparrow fluffed himself up, perched high in a tree and let loose a cascade of trills and whistles. “That’s the king-of-the-mountain song,” Beecher said. Beecher understands better than most the messages that pass between song sparrows. He and his students have been studying the birds’ communication patterns in Seattle’s Discovery Park for more than 25 years. The duel he orchestrated on a recent morning provided an opportunity to record the sotto voce song that males use only when confronting interlopers.

 

The way birds learn their songs is similar to the way babies learn to talk and adults master a golf swing, University of Washington brain researchers say. And studies of the seasonal changes in bird brains are revealing neurological twists that one day might be harnessed to heal human brains damaged by stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders.

 

The strength of the songbird system is that you can go down to the very detailed, micro-level… then explain how that leads to changes in behavior,” UW neurobiologist David Perkel said. “That’s something not a lot of neuroscience can do.” It was research on songbirds that upset the long-held notion that most animals — and most certainly humans — were born with all the gray matter they would ever have.

 

Working with canaries and chickadees in the 1980’s Fernando Nottebohm at the Rockefeller University found brain regions associated with song and the ability to locate hidden caches of food were constantly birthing new cells. Scientists soon discovered neurons sprouting in other brain areas and in the brains of other animals — including Homo sapiens. Many birds are hatched with vocalizations hard-wired into their brains. But the 4,000 species that comprise the songbirds must learn how to sing properly.

 

Perkel’s research focuses on zebra finches, which study and memorize the songs of adults. At first, the fledgings jabber or sing snippets, gradually improving until what comes out of their beaks matches the  template in their memory banks. “It’s a model for speech learning in humans,” Perkel said. Perkel is convinced  the parallels extend to all types of learning that require practice and feedback, from memorizing multiplication tables to honing a golf swing or ski jump.

 

We think by cracking this circuit in birds, he said, “it will have a large impact on our understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in learning a broad variety of skills.”

 

My thanks to Sandi Doughton of the Seattle Times for this fascinating look at how we can learn from bird songs. Her article was picked up and ran in the Chicago Tribune July 20,2012.

 

Wise Words today come from Ralph Waldo Emerson — “You cannot do a kindness too soon because you never know how soon it will be too late.”

 

Wise words from me today — “It’s never too late to think about starting your own business and there’s no easier way to begin than with my book How To Become A Mail Order Millionaire A Complete Guide To Starting Your Own Home Based Business. Long time mail order expert, Fred Broitman, founder and CEO of Chicago’s largest independently owned Direct Response/Mail Order Advertising Agency, has written the definitive guide to success in a business of your own. If you  would like to start a business that can be operated from your home no matter where you live then this book on MAIL ORDER is all you need to get started. With the power of the Internet you can become successful in your own home-based business…. and the book is sold on a 100% Guarantee of Satisfaction Or Your Money Back!

 

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  • SECRETS OF CREATING WINNING MAIL ORDER ADS
  • 14 SURE-FIRE CHECK-OFF LISTS THAT GUARANTEE HUGE PROFITS
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How To Become A Mail Order Millionaire is available from Amazon at its published price of $39.95 plus s&h or you can save $10.00 and order it direct from the publisher for only $29.95 and shipping is FREE. Send check or money order along with your name and address to: Superior Press  333 N. Michigan Avenue Suite 1032 Chicago, IL 60601

 

Darwin vs Creationists – All in Favor of Darwin Say Eye. The Eyes Have It!

New research suggests vision arose only once and earlier than expected, before 700 million years ago.

Until recently it was possible, even plausible, to think that the faculty of vision had originated several times during the course of animal evolution. New research suggests not: vision arose only once and earlier than expected, before 700 million years ago.

David Pisani and colleagues from the National University of Ireland have traced the ancestry of the three kinds of “opsin” protein that animals use, in combination with a pigment, to detect light. By comparing the genome sequences of sponges, jellyfish and other animals except sponges, but including a flat, shapeless thing called a placozoan. Some time after 755 million years ago, the common ancestor of ourselves and the placozoa duplicated a gene and changed one of the copies into a recognizable opsin.

Placozoans still have just that one kind of opsin, and it lacks the key amino acid change at position 296 that makes light detection possible, so Dr. Pisani concludes that the last opsin common ancestor, dubbed LOCA, had no vision. But on the other branch, the common ancestor of ourselves, insects and jellyfish made the change to light detection, then experienced two more duplications some time between 711 million and 700 million years ago to give the three kinds of light-sensing opsins we still possess today.

That vision was a single evolutionary innovation is a discovery that would have suprised an earlier generation of evolutionary biologists, who contrasted the compound eye of the insect with the the camera-like eye of human beings and imagined several parallel inventions. But some years ago it emerged that  the very same gene, called Pax6, commands the development of the insect eye and the human eye, hinting at a common origin. Still more surprising, a version of a Pax gene was then found directing the development of simple eyes in jellyfish. So the single origin of vision has become gradually more plausible.

All this would come as a relief to Charles Darwin, who worried about eyes, because their perfect complexity seemed to defy gradual evolutionary assembly: What use is half an eye? In 1860 he wrote to the American botanist Asa Gray: “The eye to this day gives me a cold shudder, but when I think of the fine known gradation my reason tells me I ought to conquer the odd shudder.”

In fact, the anatomy of eyes shows every gradation between simple light-sensitive spots and full cameras. The detailed genetic evidence of descent with modification from a single common ancestor further vindicates Darwin and has largely silenced the Intelligent Design movement’s use of the eye as a favored redoubt.

After the duplications that led to working opsin molecules, there seems to have been a long pause before complex eyes appeared. The first lensed eyes  that fossilized belonged to the trilobites which dominated the Cambrian oceans after 525 million years ago. Andrew Parker of Oxford University argued in a book a few years ago that newly perfected eyes explain the sudden appearance of many kinds of hard-bodied animals, the so-called Cambrian explosion. With predators hunting by sight for the first time, prey needed protection and mobility, so an arms race led to a plethora of new hard-body designs.

Just as eyes suddenly enabled our ancestors to see the world around them, so the capacity to read genomes enables us to see deep into the past. Long before LOCA there lived a creature called LUCA, the last universal common ancestor. It was only about 50 years ago that the unity of life became apparent for the first time. The molecular biologist Frances Crick, surveying the experiments that were deciphering the genetic code in bacteria, animals and yeast cells, and seeing that they were all converging on the same universal cipher, concluded that there is only one kind of life on the planet: that plants, animals and microbes must have once shared a common ancestor.

This wonderful scientific article first appeared in the Wall Street Journal, November 3, 2012 written by Matt Ridley.

If our eyes hadn’t developed over the millions of years to give us the gift of sight not only would I not have been able to write HOW TO BECOME A MAIL ORDER MILLIONAIRE, no one would be able to read it.

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HOW TO BECOME A MAIL ORDER MILLIONAIRE has been described by experts in the field as “the definitive guide to success in the mail order/direct response business.”

Long time mail order expert Fred Broitman will lead you step by step into a business that you can run from your home. No need to spend rent on an office or open a store. With the power of the Internet you can sell your product or service all over the world.

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HOW TO FIND GREAT PRODUCTS

HOW TO MAKE YOUR BUSINESS PROFITABLE RIGHT FROM THE START

HOW TO PRICE YOUR PRODUCT OR SERVICE FOR BIGGEST PROFITS

SECRETS OF CREATING WINNING MAIL ORDER ADS

14 SURE-FIRE CHECK OFF LISTS THAT GUARANTEE HUGE PROFITS

and included in this new edition…COMPLETE UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION ON HOW TO USE THE INTERNET TO SUPER CHARGE YOUR MAIL ORDER BUSINESS.

The book is sold on a 100% Guarantee of Satisfacton or Your Money Back!

HOW TO BECOME A MAIL ORDER MILLIONAIRE is available from Amazon at its published price of $39.95 plus s&h or you can order direct from the publisher for only $29.95 and free shipping. Send check or money order along with your name and address to:
SUPERIOR PRESS 333 N. Michigan Avenue Suite 1032 Chicago IL 60601.

You May Be At Risk for a Stroke or Heart Attack

Blood pressure, cholesterol level among key factors

Study clarifies four top  risks for heart attack, strokes. Having just one risk factor such as high cholesterol or smoking–can significantly increase the odds of suffering a stroke or heart attack in your lifetime according to a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The research tracked more than 250,000 participants from 18 different studies over a period of 50 years. It is the first study to look at the risks for white and black men and women across the generations. Previously clinicians would calculate a patient’s risk by projecting into the next decade. Now, with such a broad data pool, doctors can predict the likelihood of a major cardiovascular event well into the future.

This information comes from a story in the Chicago Tribune reported by Bonnie Miller Rubin. Dr. Donald Lloyd- Jones, chair and associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and the study’s lead investigator shared his findings with the Tribune.

Q. What does the study tell us now that we didn’t know before?

  • A. We have known for decades that four risk factors–blood pressure, cholesterol levels, smoking and diabetes–are related to cardiovascular disease, which is the number one killer for men and women in the U.S. What we hadn’t appreciated is the long-term risks. We now know that whether male, female, black or white, the effect of the risk factors remained consistent in determining lifetime risk, regardless of when you were born.

Q. What do these findings mean?

  • A.  That regardless of your age, sex or race, if you have optimal risk factors, your chance of having a heart attack or stroke is really low. And if a peer of the same age, sex and race has even one of these factors, he or she has a dramatically higher chance of developing a cardiovascular event during their life span.

Q. How do you define opimal cholesterol and blood pressure levels?

  • A. Total cholesterol level of less  than 180, blood pressure is less than 120 on top and 80 on the bottom.

Q. Can you give me an example of how having even one risk factor increases your likelihood of stroke or heart attack?

  • A. Men who are 45 years old and have all four factors at optimal levels–in other words, optimal blood pressure,cholesterol and no smoking or diabetes–have only a 1.4 percent risk of a heart attack event in their lifetime. In contrast, adding just one risk factor raises the chances to 40 percent for men and 20 percent for women. With two it increases to 50 and 41 percent respectively.

Q. How much do genes play in all this?

  • A. At a certain point, genes do influence factors like cholesterol levels. You can’t completely change everything but you can trump a lot of that. By keeping these other things healthy, you can delay  the day when, say, you might need medication to take care of the part that you can’t accomplish solely through lifestyle changes.

Q. Are there other factors  that play a part in cardiovascular disease?

  • A. Sleep and stress clearly play into the incremental risk. We also know that shift work can mess up a person’s metabolic profile. There is some important research going on in these areas, but at the end of the day, it’s by maintaining the four big factors that you can dramatically reduce your risk.

Q. If you have less than ideal levels of  the Big Four, can you undo the damage?

  • A. Once placques start forming in the artery walls you can slow them down and stabilize them with lifestyle changes and medication, but you can’t make them go away completely. They’re still there, taking up space and potentially obstructing blood flow. So you can be a 35-year-old and have the arteries of a 55-year-old. That’s why it’s so important that young people understand the importance of their choices. That we really need to get our foot in the door now–while they’re in their 20s and 30s, even though heart disease might not get them until their 50s or 60s.

Q. Do you ever eat a hot dog or cheeseburger?

  • A. Unfair question! Of course I do. But that has to be done in moderation and it means I have to make a trade-off to reduce calories, fat and sodium elsewhere, and that I should go burn it off with a good brisk walk.

There are few things I can do to help you with most risk factors, but one I can do and that is to help remove stress from your life. How? If you need more money, a steady income flow either part or full-time. then you should look to taking me up on my exclusive offer to buy a copy of my book HOW TO BECOME A MAIL ORDER MILLIONAIRE and save $10. It’s available at all times from Amazon at the published price of $39.95 plus s&h, but to readers of my blog you can order it direct from the publisher for only $29.95 plus $3.50 s&h. Total $33.45. Just send a check or money order to SUPERIOR PRESS 333 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1032, Chicago, IL 60601. Sold on a risk free money back guarantee of satisfaction.

Charles Dickens and his Secret Teenage Lover

Charles Dickens, one of the greats of english literature whose image was that of a pillar of Victorian morality would have been right at home with today’s sex scandals.

In 1953, when future biographer Claire Tomalin was studying English literature at Cambridge, she came across intriguing refrences  to a figure named Ellen “Nelly” Ternan, a young stage actress of minor reputation. In two separate distinguished biographies on Dickens both mentioned “this girl hanging about (the author), and they were both scathing about her,” Tomalin recalls. “She was (described as) this mercenary, who made Dickens’ kids unhappy, but to whom he seemed very attached. I sensed there was a story there.”. Cut to three decades later, Tomalin, then literary editor of the Sunday Times, mentioned her interest in Ternan to David Parker, curator of the Dickens Museum in London. He encouraged her to write Ternan’s biography.

Tomalin spent the next few years piecing together clues in letterrs, address books, diaries and photographs as she traced the arc of the secretive 13-year liaison between the great author and the actress. The result was her celebrated 1991 book, The Invisible Woman: The Story of Nelly Ternan and Charles Dickens

Ternan met Dickens in 1857, when she, her mother and sisters were actors in a play he was producing. Dickens was 45; Trenan was 18. Anxious to preserve his image as a pillar of Victorian morality, Dickens purchased a house for her near London, where he visited her secretly. Dickens seemed both to revel in and regret the affair. Dickens and Ternan apparently destroyed all correspondence between them but Tomlin says, “there was plenty of material,” including details about Ternan in missives by Dickens children: Both his son Henry and daughter Katey, for example, “confirmed that (the couple) had a child,  and it died.” Tomalin believes that Nelly and the child, said to be a boy who did not survive infancy, had been sequestered in France.

In 1876, six years after Dickens death, Ternan, then 37, married a clergyman 12 years her junior;  they had two children, neither of whom learned of the relationship with Dickens until long after their mother’s death.

Having been rescued from obscurity by Tomalin, Ternan is about to to take center stage a second time; Ralph Fiennes will direct and star in a film adaption of  The Invisible Woman, with Felicity Jones in the title role, shooting is set to begin perhaps this Spring.

Looking forward to this movie and one other  thing I’m looking forward to are your comments on any of my earlier postings. Having your feedback will help me learn what you like and of even more importance what you don’t like so I can continue to make my blogsite a permanent part of your on line life.

One question for you. Do you know anyone interested in starting a businees of their own or perhaps you may be. After all my blog site is HOW TO BECOME A MAIL ORDER MILLIONAIRE. If you or someone you know would be interested in my special offer to visitors of this site…my book HOW TO BECOME A MAIL ORDER MILLIONAIRE. Save $10 from its published price at Amazon only $29.95 plus $3.50 s&h. Total $33.45 checks or money orders can be sent to SUPERIOR PRESS 333 N. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1032, Chicago, IL 60601. All books sold on money back guarantee of satisfaction.

If You Could Choose Would You Die Like A Doctor?

It’s Not Like the Rest of Us, But It should Be.

                                  By Ken Murray, MD Clinical Assistant Professor of Family Medicine at USC

The following is excerpted from ZOCALO PUBLIC SQUARE

“Years ago Charlie, a highly respected orthopedist and a mentor of mine, found a lump in his stomach. He had a surgeon explore the area, and the diagnosis was pancreatic cancer. This surgeon was one of the best in the country. He had even invented a new procedure for this exact cancer that could triple a patient’s five year survival odds—from 5 percent to 15 percent—albeit with a poor quality of life. Charlie was uninterested. He went home the next day, closed his practice, and never set foot in a hospital again. He focused on spending time with his family and feeling as good as possible. Several months later, he died at home. He got no chemotherapy, radiation, or surgical treatment. Medicare didn’t spend much on him. It’s not a frequent topic of discussion, but doctors die, too. And they don’t die like the rest of us. What’s unusual about them is not how much treatment they get compared to most Americans, but how little.  For all the time they spend fending off the death of others, they tend to be fairly serene when faced with death themselves. They know exactly what is going to happen, they know the choices and they generally have access to any sort of medical care they could want. But they go gently.

                         Of course, doctors don’t want to die; they want to live. But they know enough about modern medicine to know its limits. And they know enough about death to know what all people fear most: dying in pain, and dying alone. They’ve talked about this with their families. They want to be sure when the time comes, that no heroic measures will happen—that they will never experience, during their last moments on earth, someone breaking their ribs in an attempt to resuscitate them with CPR (that’s what happens if CPR is done right). Almost all medical professionals have seen what we call “futile care” being performed on people. That’s when doctors bring the cutting edge of technology to bear on a grievously ill person near the end of life. The patient will get cut open, perforated with tubes, hooked up to machines, and assaulted with drugs. All of this occurs in the Intensive Care Unit at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars a day. What it buys is misery we would not inflict on a terrorist. I cannot count the number of times fellow physicians have told me, in words that vary only slightly, “Promise me if you find me like this that you’ll kill me”. They mean it. Some medical personnel  wear medallions stamped “NO CODE” to tell a physician not  to perform CPR on them. I have even seen it as a tattoo.

                              To administer medical care that makes people suffer is anguishing. Physicians are trained to gather information without revealing any of their own feelings, but in private, among fellow doctors, they’ll vent. “How can anyone do that to their family members?” they’ll ask. I suspect it’s one reason physicians have higher rates of alcohol abuse and depression than professionals in most other fields. I know it ‘s one reason I stopped participating in hospital care for the last 10 years of my practice How has it come to this—that doctors administer so much care they wouldn’t want for themselves? The simple, or not-so-simple, answer is this: patients, doctors, and the system. Imagine a scenario in which someone has lost consciousness and been admitted to an emergency room. As is so often the case, no one has made a plan for this situation, and shocked and scared family members find themselves caught up in maze of choices. They’re overwhelmed. When doctors ask if they want “everything” done, they answer yes. Then the nightmare begins. Sometimes a family really means ”do everything, “ but often just mean “do everything that’s reasonable.” The problem is that they may not know what’s reasonable, nor, in their confusion and sorrow, will they ask about it or hear what a physician may be telling them. For the most part doctors told to do “everything” will do it, whether it is reasonable or not. The above scenario is a common one. Feeding into the problem are unrealistic expectations of what doctors can accomplish. Many people think of CPR as a reliable lifesaver when, in fact, the results are usually poor. I’ve had hundreds of people brought to me in the emergency room after getting CPR. Exactly one, a healthy man who’d had no heart troubles, walked out of the hospital. If a patient suffers from severe illness, old age, or a terminal disease, the odds of a good outcome from CPR are infinitesimal, while the odds of suffering are overwhelming. Poor knowledge and misguided expectations lead to a lot of bad decisions. But of course it’s not just patients making these things happen. Doctors play an enabling role, too. The trouble is that even doctors who hate to administer futile care must find a way to address the wishes of patients and families. Some doctors are stronger communicators than others and some doctors are more adamant, but the pressures they all face are similar.

                            When I faced circumstances involving end-of-life choices, I adopted the approach of laying out only the options that I thought were reasonable (as I would in any situation) as early in the process as possible .When patients or families brought up unreasonable choices, I would discuss the issue in layman’s terms that portrayed the downsides clearly. If patient s or families still insisted on treatments I considered pointless or harmful, I would offer to transfer their care to another doctor or hospital. Should I have been more forceful at times? I know that some of those transfers still haunt me..

                        It’s easy to find fault with both doctors and patients, but in many ways the parties are simply victims of a larger system that encourages excessive treatment. Several years ago my older cousin had a seizure that turned out to be the result of lung cancer that had gone to his brain. I arranged for him to see various specialists, and we learned that with aggressive treatment of his condition, including three to five hospital visits a week for chemotherapy, he would live perhaps four months. Ultimately, he decided against any treatment and simply took pills for brain swelling. He moved in with me. We spent the next eight months doing a bunch of things that he enjoyed, having fun together like we hadn’t in decades. He even gained a bit of weight  eating his favorite foods. He had no serious pain, and he remained high-spirited. One day he didn’t wake up. He spent the next three days in a coma-like sleep and then died. The cost of his medical care for those eight months, for the one drug he was taking, was about $20. My cousin knew he  wanted a life of quality, not just quantity. Don’t most of us?

                        If there is a state of the art of end-of-life care, it is this: death with dignity; As for me, my physician has my choices. They were easy to make, as they are for most physicians. There will be no heroics, and I will go gentle into that good night. Like my cousin. Like my fellow doctors”.

Please share with me your comments about this subject we will all have to eventually address. However in the meantime while still in good health, if you’d like to consider starting your own business and even becoming one of the MAIL ORDER MILLIIONAIRES featured in the newest revised edition of my book, here’s my special offer to you.

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How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the OWS Protests

That’s the headline to Matt Taibbi’s article in the current issue of ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE. Last week’s post was from a conservative columnist who writes for FORTUNE MAGAZINE. It’s only fair for a progressive view–and there’s few as good as Matt Taibbi. He alone is well worth subscribing to one of my favorite magazines ROLLING STONE. Herein are excerpts:

“I have a confession to make. At first I misunderstood Occupy Wall Street. The first few time I went down to Zuccotti Park, I came away with mixed feelings. I loved the energy and was amazed by the obvious organic appeal of the movement, the way it was growing on its own. But my initial impression was that it would not be taken very seriously by the Citibanks and Goldman Sachs of the world. You could put 50,000 angry protestors on Wall Street, 100,000 even, and Lloyd Blankfein is probably not going to break a sweat. He knows he’s not going to wake up tomorrow and see Cornel West or Richard Trumka running the Federal Reserve. He knows modern finance is a giant mechanical parasite that only an expert surgeon can remove. Yell and scream all you want but he and his fellow Franksteins are the only ones who know how to turn the machine off.

That’s what I was thinking during the first few weeks of the protests. But I’m beginning to see another angle. Occupy Wall Street was always about something much bigger than a movement against big banks and modern finance. It’s about providing a forum for people to show how tired they are not just of Wall Street but EVERYTHING. This is a visceral, impassioned, deep-seated rejection of the entire direction of our society, a refusal to take even one more step forward into the shallow commercial abyss of phoniness, short-term calculation, withered idealism and intellectual bankruptcy that American mass society has become. If there is such a thing as going on strike from one’s own culture, this is it. And by being so broad in scope and so elemental in its motivation, it‘s flown over the heads of many on both the right and the left.

The right-wing media wasted no time in cannon-blasting the movement with its usual idiotic clichés, casting Occupy Wall Street as a bunch of dirty hippies who should get a job and stop chewing up Mike Bloomberg’s police overtime budget with their urban sleepovers. Just like they did a half-century ago, when the debate over the Vietnam War somehow stopped being about why we were brutally murdering millions of innocent Indochinese civilians and instead became a referendum on bralessness and long hair and flower-child rhetoric, the depraved flacks of the right-wing media have breezily blown off a generation of fraud and corruption and market-perverting bailouts, making the whole debate about the protestors themselves—their hygiene, their ‘envy’ of the rich, their ‘hypocrisy’.

The protestors, chirped Supreme Reichskank Ann Coulter, ‘needed three thing: showers, jobs and a point’. Her colleague Charles Krauthammer went so far as to label the protestors hypocrites for having iPhones. ‘OWS’, he said is Starbucks-sipping, Levi’s- clad, iPhone clutching protestors (denouncing) corporate America even as they weep for Steve Jobs, corporate titan, billionaire eight times over’. Apparently because Goldman and Citibank are corporations, no protestors can ever consume a corporate product—not jeans, not cellphones and definitely not coffee’—if he also wants to complain about tax money going to pay off some billionaire banker’s bets against his own crappy mortgages.

Meanwhile on the other side of the political spectrum, there were scads of progressive pundits like me who wrung our hands with worry that OWS was playing right into the hands of assholes like Krauthammer. DON’T GIVE THEM ANY AMMUNITION! we counseled. STAY ON MESSAGE! BE SPECIFIC!. We were all playing the Rorschach-test game with OWS trying to squint at it and see what we wanted to see in the movement. Viewed through the prism of our desire to make near-term, within the system changes, it was hard to see how skirmishing with cops in New York would help foreclosed-upon middle-class families in Jacksonville and San Diego.

What both sides missed is that OWS is tired of all this. They don’t care what we think they’re about, or should be about. They just want something different.

We’re all born wanting the freedom to imagine a better and more beautiful future. But modern America has become a place so drearily confining and predictable that it chokes the life out of that built-in desire. Everything from our pop culture to our economy to our politics feels oppressive and unresponsive. People want to go someplace for at least five minutes where no one is trying to bleed you or sell you something.

I think I understand now that that’s what the Occupy movement is all about. It’s about dropping out if only for a moment, and trying something new. It doesn’t need to tell the world what it wants. It is successful for now, just by being something different.”

These are only excerpts from Matt’s excellent article in the November 22nd issue of ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE. To read it in its entirety, pickup a copy or better yet become a subscriber. I’ve been hooked on their political reporting for 25 years and with age, year after year, it only gets better.

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